Saturday, July 1, 2017

Identity Based Encryption

Identity Based Encryption

We were readying the house for visitors and cleaning-up. In the loft, on a bookshelf,  I found a house key. It fit the door to our house, but didn't unlock it.
Where did this key come from? What door does it open? 

It occurred to me that some kind of identifier would help. We've got several keys for other houses and they're all tagged. This key happened to not be tagged. 

This is one aspect of  Identity Based Encryption. With crypto, there are keys. What files, messages, or systems do the keys unlock? The identity is more important than the key itself. 

It's not a stretch to say that a key without an identity is worthless. Indeed, a key under your control without an identity that others would recognize may seem more  secure. The fact that others cannot know what door (file, message, system) it unlocks may be a kind of security. 
But you know what it's for. 

My employer sells "identity based encryption", both asymmetric (IBE) and symmetric (IBSE). It's good stuff. It makes sense. 

This unlabeled house key brings the story to life. Keys need identities so their purpose can be known. 

-- R; <><
 


No comments:

Post a Comment